Tag GCHQ

InfoSec Week 8, 2019

Dutch security researcher Victor Gevers found misconfigured MongoDB database containing facial recognition and other sensitive information about the Uyghur Muslim minority in China. Looks like the company behind the database is Chinese surveillance company SenseNets.
https://www.zdnet.com/article/chinese-company-leaves-muslim-tracking-facial-recognition-database-exposed-online/

The UK's GCHQ intelligence agency subsidiary, the National Cyber Security Centre, evaluated Huawei devices with the vendor and unofficially decided that the risk using Huawei devices in the infrastructure can be managed.
This is a quite interesting turning point as other US allies are banning Huawei devices from their networks.
https://www.bbc.com/news/business-47274643

If you want to know the alternatives for the PGP functionality, George Tankersley wrote a nice list for that.
https://blog.gtank.cc/modern-alternatives-to-pgp/

Open Privacy Research Society released an alpha version of Cwtch, decentralized, privacy-preserving, asynchronous multi-party messaging protocol that can be used to build other applications.
https://openprivacy.ca/blog/2019/02/14/cwtch-alpha/

Linux kernel through 4.20.10 version contain use after free arbitrary code execution vulnerability.
https://cve.mitre.org/cgi-bin/cvename.cgi?name=CVE-2019-8912

Check Point researchers have discovered 19 years old critical vulnerability in the WinRAR software that can be exploited just by extracting an archive.
https://research.checkpoint.com/extracting-code-execution-from-winrar/

Tavis Ormandy discovered old stack buffer overflow vulnerability in the MatrixSSL implementation used primarily by the embedded devices.
https://www.openwall.com/lists/oss-security/2019/02/15/1

Really in-depth article about the discovery and exploitation of the local privilege elevation vulnerability in the LG kernel driver (CVE-2019-8372).
http://www.jackson-t.ca/lg-driver-lpe.html

Microsoft is finally deprecating weak SHA-1 hash family in their Windows update mechanism.
https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2019/02/mandatory-update-coming-to-windows-7-2008-to-kill-off-weak-update-hashes/

Brian Krebs wrote an article about the recent widespread DNS hijacking attacks attributed to the Iranian hackers.
https://krebsonsecurity.com/2019/02/a-deep-dive-on-the-recent-widespread-dns-hijacking-attacks/

Independent Security Evaluators published a security comparison of the top five password managers which are working on Windows 10.
https://www.securityevaluators.com/casestudies/password-manager-hacking/

InfoSec Week 51, 2018

Google Project Zero published a blog about the FunctionSimSearch open-source library which is capable to find similar functions in the assembly.
They are using it to detect code statically-linked vulnerable library functions in executables.
https://googleprojectzero.blogspot.com/2018/12/searching-statically-linked-vulnerable.html

London's police is testing facial recognition technology in central London this week. Feel free to get your face scanned and processed for the bright future.
https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2018/12/londons-police-will-be-testing-facial-recognition-in-public-for-2-days/

Facebook gave Spotify and Netflix access to a users' private messages. Also shared user information with Microsoft, Amazon, Yahoo without explicit consent.
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/18/technology/facebook-privacy.html

Researchers published results of an investigation into Russian election interference on behalf of the US Senate Intelligence Committee. They have analyzed data sets from Facebook, Twitter, Google.
https://www.newknowledge.com/disinforeport

Adam Langley wrote about their further Google Chrome TLS experiments with the post-quantum lattice based cryptography.
https://www.imperialviolet.org/2018/12/12/cecpq2.html

Matthew Green wrote his thoughts on GCHQ’s latest proposal for surveilling encrypted messaging and phone calls.
https://blog.cryptographyengineering.com/2018/12/17/on-ghost-users-and-messaging-backdoors/

Tencent Blade Team discovered a remote code execution vulnerability in SQLite. It was already fixed in Chromium.
https://blade.tencent.com/magellan/index_en.html

Good story about the investigation of the Chinese industrial espionage.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/resources/idt-sh/Looking_for_Chinas_spies

University of California, Berkeley researchers are building open-source secure enclave using RISC-V.
https://hackaday.com/2018/12/13/risc-v-will-stop-hackers-dead-from-getting-into-your-computer/

Well-known cypherpunk movement founder Timothy May passed away.
https://reason.com/blog/2018/12/16/tim-may-influential-writer-on-crypto-ana

Microsoft introduced Windows Sandbox for applications.
https://techcommunity.microsoft.com/t5/Windows-Kernel-Internals/Windows-Sandbox/ba-p/301849

Interesting paper on systematic parsing of X.509 certificates with strong termination guarantees: "Systematic Parsing of X.509: Eradicating Security Issues with a Parse Tree".
https://arxiv.org/abs/1812.04959

A Dive into Cypherlock, a tool that could prevent forced decryption.
https://medium.com/chainrift-research/farewell-forced-decryption-a-dive-into-cypherlock-e515223a7123

Instant, re-usable, generic MD5 collisions over different file formats. https://github.com/corkami/pocs/blob/master/collisions/README.md

InfoSec Week 37, 2018

Tesla model S is using a 40bit challenge response scheme broken back in 2005. Researchers stole a car in ~6 seconds with precomputed tables.
https://www.esat.kuleuven.be/cosic/fast-furious-and-insecure-passive-keyless-entry-and-start-in-modern-supercars/

Zerodium exploit acquisition program published a serious Tor Browser 7.x vulnerability leading to a full bypass of Tor / NoScript 'Safest' security level which is supposed to block all javascript.
This kind of bug is an law enforcement dream.
https://twitter.com/Zerodium/status/1039127214602641409

Very interesting read from Troy Hunt on the effectiveness of negative media coverage and shaming of bad security.
https://www.troyhunt.com/the-effectiveness-of-publicly-shaming-bad-security/

Researchers say that the developers of Adware Doctor, the fourth highest ranking paid app in the Mac App Store, have found a way to bypass Apple restrictions and sends the browsing history of its users to a server in China. Apple already removed the application from the Mac Store.
https://objective-see.com/blog/blog_0x37.html

Apple has also removed most of the popular security applications offered by cyber-security vendor Trend Micro from its official Mac App Store after they were caught stealing users' sensitive data without their consent.
https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/trend-micro-apps-leak-user-data-removed-from-mac-app-store/

European Court of Human Rights rules that GCHQ Data collection violates the human rights charter.
https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/sep/13/gchq-data-collection-violated-human-rights-strasbourg-court-rules

The Iran government, at least since 2016, is is spying on its citizens, Kurdish and Turkish natives, and ISIS supporters, using mobile applications with a malware.
The operation has been named Domestic Kitten.
https://research.checkpoint.com/domestic-kitten-an-iranian-surveillance-operation/

Researchers introduced previously overlooked side-channel attack vector called Nemesis that abuses the CPU’s interrupt mechanism to leak microarchitectural instruction timings from enclaved execution environments such as Intel SGX, Sancus, and TrustLite.
https://github.com/jovanbulck/nemesis

India’s controversial Aadhaar identity database software was hacked, ID database compromised.
The vulnerability could allow someone to circumvent security measures in the Aadhaar software, and create new entries.
https://www.huffingtonpost.in/2018/09/11/uidai-s-aadhaar-software-hacked-id-database-compromised-experts-confirm_a_23522472

Criminals are faking Google Analytics script to steal credential and stay under the radar.
https://gwillem.gitlab.io/2018/09/06/fake-google-analytics-malware/

The OpenSSL team released version 1.1.1. There are a lots of new features like TLS 1.3 support, side-channel hardening, new RNG, SHA3, Ed25519 support.
https://www.openssl.org/blog/blog/2018/09/11/release111/